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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  May 18, 2015 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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it is the top of the hour. welcome to "morning joe."
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with us we have mike barnicle and david ignatius. a lot to get to this morning both foreign and domestically. this morning full service is being restored along the northeast corridor. trains are resuming between new york and philadelphia. amtrak service. six days after the deadly derailment in philadelphia. it comes as the fbi is now investigating on whether a flying object may have hit the train just moments before it crashed. the secretary of transportation anthony fox joins us later this hour. in politics another candidate falls prey to the knowing what we know now question on the iraq war. how does this happen? it's not a hard question, everybody. >> we were talking about it earlier. it's beyond us. >> marco rubio's answer to that question and what it could mean to his candidacy. and it went on and on. so we had to like cut it into
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pieces. but it just wouldn't end. he just needs to stop and answer it correctly. and last night the end of an era as amc's "mad men" comes to an end. we'll take a look back at the ground breaking series. how do we do that without telling what people happened? >> i have it on dvr because i was going to get up at 5:00 in the morning to be be here with you. >> i watched it. and i'll tell people what happened. >> you're going to do that? >> why not. they can watch it online. if they wanted to watch it, they should have watched it. >> wow, hardcore. >> yeah. >> in this new world -- letsd get's get to the big news. we'll start in syria where a key leader of isis is dead and his wife this custody after a daring raid. u.s. officials say the troops travelled from northern iraq in black hawk helicopters and osprey like these. it's just the second time that u.s. special operations forces
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carried out a mission in isis-controlled territory in syria. not much is known about abu sayyaf sayyaf, he's considered a top isis money man who managed isis' oil and gas income and he was personally close to the isis leader abu al baghdadi. but isis is celebrating a major victory in iraq which may be a bigger problem here. joining us now from london, chief global correspondent bill neely. what's the significance of the fall of ramadi? >> yes, good morning mika. i think the news from ramadi is somewhat trumps that from syria. ramadi is a disaster in three parts. there is the defeat of iraq security forces itself and the fact that another provincial capital is now in isis hands. secondly it's the manner of the defeat. iraq security forces proving once again how utterly incompetent they can be.
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by all accounts, their retreat from are a maddeddy was complete chaos. but third, the consequences of this, not just that isis now has the momentum that it has weapons and that it's now 70 miles or closer from baghdad. but also the prospect that she a militia, some iranian backed, are now the only solution toa militia, some iranian backed, are now the only solution to militia, some iranian backed, are now the only solution to is the only way. will the u.s. continue bombing ramadi in support of iranian backed militias? if you look at it as the glass half full, you might say that for that last year and a half ramadi has been surrounded and therefore it was only a matter of time before it fell. and john kerry has been saying of the same thing this morning saying, look, isis' movements, its finances its personnel have been stopped. and he's absolutely confident
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that ramadi will be retaken. but that could really take some time even if you are as optimistic as john kerry is. >> nbc's bill neely. thank you. david ignatius here's what the "wall street journal" says. if iraqi forces can't hold ramadi, they're a long way from recapturing mosul which has been under isis control for nearly a year. it undercuts assurances that the war is going well. >> i think that's a fair assessment. this has been the battle that we the u.s.-led coalition, was ready to fight next. they said, no no we're not going to mosul, we're going to anbar province. and its capital ramadi has now fallen. and it's fallen because the people that we have been saying are going to do the fighting iraqi security forces and sunni
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militia militias, simply aren't ready. so desperation they're calling on the people we don't want do the fight whog are thetghting who are the shia militias. this is a weekend where you saw u.s. military power at its most effective capturing sayyaf -- killing him, capturing his wife. getting enormous amounts of intelligence. but you also saw the weakness in our strategy this the ramadi fall. >> david, the raid within syria, obviously we're in awe of the skill and courage of the special forces units. but does it mean that we now have better on ground intelligence than we have had previously? >> it appears to be a fusion of better on ground intelligence, better human intelligence and better use of surveillance drones, other overhead as assets that can help us see and listen. it looks to me like the
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beginning of the cycle of night raids that became so familiar in iraq where you come in u.s. forces come in in the dark of night, conduct attacks and take away troves of intelligence that then fuel more attacks. the islamic state can't know what was taken from abu sayyaf's layer, they can't know what his wife will tell coalition interrogators. so they're now in a state of uncertainty which is unusual for them. but as you say, this is u.s. military operations at their most aggressive and effective. imagine if one of those official operations soldiers had been captured, what we'd be looking at this morning. >> and back across the border in iraq ramadi falls. what does this portend for american relationships with iran seeing that iran controls militias that apparently have a fighting capacity that the iraqi
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army does not have? >> well, we've known that the iranian militias are tough. at the end of the day iranian militias were not strong enough to take tikrit to the east. so there are limits on their power. i don't think the sunni residents of ramadi will tolerate that area being taken over by shiite that lish shamilitias. what troubles me is that a year after mosul was overrun, a year in which we've been talking about building up sunni capability, we're really no closer to doing that than we were. this is a strategy we've announced, supposedly getting cooperation from the iraqi government and it just isn't working. that's what we saw over the weekend. >> so former florida governor jeb bush weighed in on the weekend's isis raid at an event in iowa laying blame for the creation of the radical group at
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the president's feet. >> it's encouraging that one of the senior isis leader has been killed if it's been confirmed. and kudos to the special forces the best in the world. having said that, this administration created the void that created this emerging caliphate that is far bigger than anything that existed before and there is no long storm strategy on how to deal with it. >> bush was campaigning in iowa just days after announcing that he will not participate in this summer's straw poll there dismissing rumor that's won't be competeing there at all. >> i'm here in iowa speaking about iowa just to remind everybody, i'm going to -- if i go beyond the consideration this and be an active candidate, i'll campaign hard here. i just don't do straw polls. >> and that night in des moines, bush joined other republican presidential hopefuls. a strict ten minute time limit forced each speaker to get straight to his or her point
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with most focusing on foreign policy and national security. >> if i'm president of the united states, and you're thinking about joining al qaeda or isil anybody thinking about that? i'm not going to call a judge. i'm going to call a drone and we will kill you. >> okay. there is one way of looking at things. how about another one. one candidate who was not there, marco rubio, faced tough questions about whether he's changed positions on the decision to invade iraq. >> six weeks ago, it made sense to invade iraq in 2003, now you say it was a mistake. >> no, two different questions. it was not a mistake. the president -- this is the way the real world works. the president based on the information provided -- >> you were saying based on the -- based on what we know now. >> based on what we know now i wouldn't have thought man manny pacquiao would beat in that
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fight. >> but you were asked the same question -- >> no it was not the same question. >> it went on for another painful minute and then closed like this. >> it was not a mistake for the president to go into iraq based on the information he was provided as president. today we know -- if the president had known that there were no weapons of mass destruction at the time, you still would have had to deal with saddam hussein, but the process would have been different. >> nick, he was doing well. what happened here? why is this so confounding? >> it seems he has bad intel on the boxesing match too. but the guys who beat the drum for the iraq war are still away and are still the foreign policy establishment of the gop. candidates are being pulled back and forth between the leaders in their own party who are conservative and the people of the country who think this was a terrible mistake including
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republicans. and don't want to hear a defense of it. problems is there are donors who think it's a good idea and don't want to hear them backing down. >> kasie hunt has been following the republicans all weekend long. marco rubio getting stumped on that one key question is not the only thing that happened this weekend. and there seem to be more and more candidates lining up. >> that's right. i think you saw in iowa over the weekend the completely unsettled nature of this field. and republicans privately and increasingly publicly are starting to get really nervous about how this field ultimately could play out. i think everybody was hoping for a process that was going to go to the opposite of what we saw in 2012, the narrowed down quickly thargs allow quickly, take allowed them to unify quickly who could take on hillary clinton. you played a little bit of jeb
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bush and he has had a testy couple of days. and i think there is a lot of sensing blood in the water if you will, around that giving a lot of the other people a lift. i was surprised marco rubio took take that tact. he could appear too young too untested. it doesn't necessarily come across in that interview as though he's sure of himself and decisive shall we say. >> yeah, at this point, it's not like there is a wrong answer to the question. i don't know. the "washington post" reports that the republican party leaders are becoming increasingly worried over the number of candidates likely to run for the white house with no clear frontrunner, some fear the primary battle could stretch well into the spring of 2016, costing the party tens of millions of dollars and moving the eventual nominee even further to the right which would look like the other election. so far six candidates have formally entered the race, another three have potential
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announcement the dwas set, at least another seven have formed committees and organizations exploring pids. and the straw poll launched last week list as whopping 36 potential candidates although some of those listed have ruled out bids. help me out here. nick. i mean what are they thinking? >> i think there is like a post-modern quality to this. it takes a lot less to run for president than in the past. if you have a social media following and you're on tv often enough, and you can put some gas in your car and drive around iowa and new hampshire for a year, you can be a candidate for president. and so the barrier to entry is low. and furthermore if you have a billionaire friend who will pump money into a super pac, you can go on for even longer. >> it gets to the obscenity of the campaign himself.
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these campaigns, faux as well as actual, here is the paragraph campaigns are in practice of intricate con sisterterister lagss of tax exempt group engineered after the watergate scandal. so we have this reservoir this tsunami of money inspecting-spect-spect-in-inspecting our politics. >> jeb bush has hired a field manager, and yet he's not running according to his campaign. he says he isn't even exploring a bid for the presidency because that would also pull him under the fundraising rules. >> except when he slips. david ignatius, we have an update to a story we were following on friday. george stephanopoulos has issued
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his third apology in less than a week for failing to disclose $75,000 in donations to the clinton foundation. he once again said it was a mistake to make the donations or disclose them while covering the foundation. but several journalists including former colleagues at abc news are questioning step november plus' explanation saying he should have known better. >> i like george. i worked with him. and have great respect for him. but i wanted to just take him by the they can and say, george, what were you thinking. clearly he was not thinking. i thought it was outrageous and i sam sorry that again the public's trust in the media is being challenged and frayed because of the actions of some of the top people in the business. >> like carol i was completely dumbfounded, particularly in the interview with schweizer. i couldn't believe he was making
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the whole conversation about the foundation that it didn't occur to him to say maybe i should disclose that i've given them a lot of money and participated in a lot of their events. it simply is an indication that very smart people can sometimes be very foolish. i even think that to one extent step step novemberhe was trying to repair relations with the clintons because his book put him on the outs. >> you want to be seen as independent and if there is anybody in the world that you want to seem independent from it's the clintons. so that's the mistake. the apology is fine. i like george. i think by and large he's done a good job of being even handed in his work. but this was a mistake and i'm not sure he will recover from it anytime soon. >> and peter schweizer says stephanopoulos' ties to the group runs much deeper than just
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donations, that has schweizer reexamining his tough interview on abc "this week" calling for a second interview with the network. >> i hu about the fact that he had worked for the clintons, but honestly, i sort of believed and assumed that he had sort of put that in the past. and i thought he was simply asking tough questions. now i think the revelations that have come output the interview at least in my mind in a totally different context. i don't mind tough questions, but you wonder what's the motivation. is it the search for truth or is it because he's trying to in a sense do something to benefit the clinton foundation which he obviously has some affinity for. he's been on panels which chelsea clinton, he's moderated debates and discussions at clinton foundation events. how can you do that and cover that same political family in the political season? to me it's mind boggling. >> interesting. so david ignatius, and i had like your take on i guess the apology because the part that i think is problematic is that he
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covered the story about donations to the foundation while not disclosing that he gave donations to the foundation. having said that, i'm listening to all these sound bites and people dumbfounded and shocked and can't believe what they have seen and it just seems to me that he worked on the clinton campaign, he worked tirelessly to elect bill clinton. he served under bill clinton. who would be so surprised that he has ties to the clintons? if anything that seems to me to be a lack of judgment on the people who are hiring him to think that he can just erase those from his brain. biases exist. >> that me be the issue. i wrote a column a few years ago noting the rifle of george stephanopoulos likeable, respectable person in many ways, as an objective tv anchor/commentator person. not a commentator, an anchor. and just asking was that being
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done automatically by fiat as opposed to earned. and the way you earn trust in jobs lying this ss like this is being open disclosing every relevant to covering a story. and it's not surprising the author of an expose of the clinton foundation grilled by george, says, hey, wait a minute this isn't appropriate for somebody to ask me these tough questions, have been a con be tribute tore to the very charity that i'm exposing what i think is wrongdoing and never disclose that to readers. and i -- but i think there is a large he request p. there has been a pass through of many political personalities on all networks people who made their bones as politicians, then becoming anchor, commentator and i think all the bostons of networks need to look at that more closely. quite apart from how the george situation is resolved. . >> and doesn't mean eradicateing people with former political ties. >> no, but if you're a
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journalist you have to be a journalist. >> do yoi don't disagree. but i'm saying everybody on television has biases world views and opinions. let's not pretend that there are certain journalists that are completely objective and have tunnel vision and no lean. that's yesterday. that's when people pretended to be objective and no one talked about it. everybody has one. and i think the important thing here is the lack of transparency. that's it. look at joe and me. totally different world views. totally different ideologies. >> and there is this rapidly spinning revolving door between politics and media now. and it's different. and i think to some extent you have to pick your lane and get in one and stay there for a while. it's fine to jump careers and change. but in factual the cable shows all these networks are now full of people who come out of politics who are then commenting
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on politics. but there is a problem with reliance on paid partisans to do news gathering. >> but if you block out everybody who has had political experience, you're also blocking out an insight and a sense of a knowledge about the process because you don't want to appear partisan. i don't mind that people who have had political jobs come on television and give us theirprognosticate. they know how it works. just be transparent and the information is richer. what got lost here is transparency. it was not honest. >> one of the larger issues involved here, and not just with george stephanopoulos, he's a good guy and smart guy. but one of the larger issues involved i would think is over the last decade or so the blend of news and opinion leading consumers of news to sit out there watching tv or reading papers wondering, well what's the news. and who is a news person.
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you're on as a commentator, but are you a news person, is it your view? what is the news? that's the question. >> well, this is definitely reopening the question. still ahead on "morning joe," chairman of the armed services committee john mccain will be here on the set to discuss the u.s. isis strategy. plus secretary of transportation anthony foxx weighs in on where we are going as a nation and how we'll get there. it's more than the cloud. it's security - and flexibility. it's where great ideas and vital data are stored. with centurylink you get advanced technology solutions from a trusted it partner. including cloud and hosting services - all backed by an industry leading broadband network and people committed to helping you grow your business. you get a company that's more than just the sum of it's parts. centurylink. your link to what's next.
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speed, call, data, and reliability. so you never have to settle. $80 a month. for 10 gigs. and $15 per line. stop by or visit us online. and save without settling. only on verizon. it's 26 past the hour. time now to take a look at the morning papers. 9 people are dead and 18 more injured after a confrontation sunday in waco between rival biker gangs and police shoot-out. it happened outside the twin peaks restaurant located in a popular shopping center. police say eight people died at the scene, one more died at a
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nearby hospital, but no police officers or bystanders were injured. the fight apparently broke out in the bathroom before spilling out into the bar and then finally the parking lot. at least five rival gangs were gathering at the restaurant, so they had officers waiting nearby. the sergeant said at least 100 individuals had been detained so far in the investigation. "chicago tribune," there is growing criticism this morning after an egyptian court sentenced the first freely elected leader to death. the court recommended the punishment for former president morsi and more than 100 brotherhood supporters. the sentences in connection to a mass prison break in 2011. it is the latest in a series of mass death sentences since morsi was removed from power almost two years ago. but a state department official says the has death sentence is inconsistent with the rule of law and the u.s. is deeply
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concerned. david, former president morsi sentenced to death in egypt. the arab spring has now turned into a continuing rolling middle east nightmare. no? >> i find this really very sad. here is the first democratically elected president in egypt. he may not have been doing a very good job, but to have him deposed by the military and then sentenced to death should really chill egyptians. this sentence can be commuted both by religious authorities and even by president al sisi the current reigning president. i hope so. it does send a terrible signal to the world as a whole as to what egypt's new government is all about. >> what is it all about? >> in part it's about taking revenge for these actions of the muslim brother hood.
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the egypt shan military has been fighting the muslim brotherhood and it seems to be engrained in them as their prerogative, their basic mission. and they don't seem to have a good governor to regulate their actions. and this death sentence is the latest example. >> all right. other papers now "new york times," two women who were once strangers at columbia university discovered they were actually sisters. they were born to the same teen mom in florida in the 1980s and then raised by adoptive family this is different parts of the country. but different introductions at a college writing class they found out they had a lot in common. and since that first meeting, the sisters have become very close spending holidays together and finally meeting their birth mother in florida. what a story. >> an amazing story. >> sports illustrated, despite torrential rain and sloppy track, kentucky derby winner
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american pharoah finished accept lengths ahead of his competitors to win the preakness stakes saturday. if he can win the belmont stakes on june 6, he'll be the first trim drown winner since 1978. and mitt romney squared off against evan did ter holyfield holyfield -- really? why did he do this is thisdrown winner since 1978. and mitt romney squared off against evan did ter holyfield -- really? why did he do this is this? >> romney entered the ring to the song i will survive led by his wife ann romney. he was then these at trickily stripped of a suit and tie so he could box shirtless. and the real winner was charity vision. the event raised over $1 million for the nonprofit which provides surgeries for the blind around the world. kasie, you were there. you sent me a picture. you were wearing awesome pink boxing gloves. i think you were fighting mitt,
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too, is that possible? what happened? >> yes i sparred a little bit. i covered romney for 18 months in his presidential bid this 2012. so i suggested that we do a little bit of sparring. ann romney helped him into his gloves and said we've been waiting to do this for years. it was so fun any. so she was pretty excited about it. but he only took his shirt off there because evander holyfield told him that he had to. he said he was going to wear a muscle t shirt, but holyfield said dude that's not how you do it. >> i'll tell you he wears it well. that's nice. and that's fun. why not. thank you, kasie. mike barb mike "usa today." >> putin scored eight goals in sochi as his hockey team played an expedition game. team featured former nhl players and won 18-6. this is the second time putin has played in an exhibition game. he scored six goals and five assists last march.
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that's like a triple hat trick. and the goalie obviously just waved the pucks right into the net. coming up, nobody is questioning his foreign policy expertise. member of the homeland security committee congressman will hurt spent nearly a decade as cia undercover officer in the middle east. he joins the conversation next. ford is taking the ecoboost challenge all across america. ford has really stepped up! check out fusion and find out why ford is the brand more people buy, and buy again. i like the grill. the sexy look to it. epa-estimated 37 miles per gallon on the highway. are you serious? fusion is amazing. my opinion of ford has dramatically changed. take the ecoboost challenge at your ford dealer. and for a limited-time get a fusion with zero for sixty plus one-thousand bonus cash plus seven-fifty cash if you own a ford or qualifying competitive vehicle.
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joining us now representative from texas, con map man will hurd once an uncover officer in the cai ichltcia. and in boston, dean of the fletcher school of law. i want to ask you about the raid in syria. what is the significant answerce and what we got out of it compared to the fall of ramadi? >> mixed bag coming out of iraq. both are important. i would say so the side of the raid, as david said earlier this is a signal of the ability to get inside with the kind of night raids that ultimately
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brought down al qaeda in iraq back in baghdad in the middle of the last decade. and it also is this combination of cyber unmanned and special forces this new triad showing either teeth. on the are a hadramadi side we can do this, but it will be challenging and it's a significant that will we have work to do. >> results of the raid, we have this money man the wife has been taken in and they have freed and 18-year-old woman. what value in the fight against isis do you think was recovered there? >> we'll know more after the fbi starts the in-tear ga difference process. we also have to recognize the extra steenlg i gorategic value of
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the demonstration. the essence of all of this is intel and its capability. >> so let's goat there next. what are you most worried about in terms of our approach? >> the thing i'm most worried about, we need to be aggressive. this example of capturing or killing abu sayyaf is a good example, but fwheedneed to do more. there are hundreds doing document exploitation on whether computers that were gained, papers that were there. be abu sayyaf was kind of the cfo of isis. so we have to learn a lot about the operations of the organization, how they're raising money, how they're getting money. and will could lead to additional -- >> so it could be a big get.
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>> is he himself important as the mastermind of the financial networks? is he important as a person or is it more the documents and his knowledge of the network? >> i think both. taking someone that has this level of experience off the table, who is the bench. is there someone that has the same level of connection same understanding of how to get things done. so removing him is important as well as obtaining all the information that someone in his position in the organization has. >> you were in iraq last week? >> yes, sir. >> can that country still be held together? >> you know, it was interesting. i was expecting to hear three different stories and they're actually committed to a one iraq. and i wasn't expecting that. the question will become we have to continue our training and
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equip mission. training the forces. make sure the sunni tribes get involved in the battle. we need to make sure that the sunni tribes that are loyal to the prime minister are driving that wedge in rarks against isis and the sunni population and we need to make sure they continue to equip the peshmerga and kurds. so a long way to go, but i'm still hopeful. >> i want to ask will hurd who is one of my gurus in the modern cia, will, how can the cia step up its game and play a more active role in gathering exploiting intelligence taking the fight to these isis operative this is syria and iraq? >> david it's a great question. good to see you. this starts with the white house and our strategy in the region.
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there is a level of risk aversion that is happening throughout some of these conflict zones. the men and women in the cia are trained for this type of operation. and we don't have individuals on the ground. and so in order to fix that problem, we have to operate from kuwait, from turkey, from iraq. and it requires us to be a lot aggressive. so the president needs to take the gloves off when it comes to our men and women in the cia. ambassador ryan crocker probably one of the best things the foreign service has produced, he always says we need pumps and wing tips on the ground, too, in places like this in order to build relationships with our partners in the region. >> i don't think the admiral is wearing wing tips this morning but admiral, you said that the fall of ramadi is neither bull republican or gettysburg and that we could still do this. my question is who is the "we"
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and how issis it possible to still do this? >> from a military perspective, what we want do is take the fact that the isis has the central position which they're exploiting at the momentarily. peshmerga coming from the north we need to arm them as the congressman said.momentarily. peshmerga coming from the north, we need to arm them as the congressman said. going after their logistics in the west and syria. and we have to get the iraqi security forces in the game. and we have to find an accommodation to work with the shia militias. not iran but the shia militias. and i'm encouraged by what the congressman said. i think if we put them under three axis pressure, we have a viable strategy. in terms of the "we "," we need to
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approach the jordanians about being involved. we need more boots on the ground from the u.s. not 100,000, but probably 10,000. if we do all those things, i think we have a reasonable shot at this. >> all right. congressman, will hurd here on the set and admiral thank you as well for joining us. up next, in the wake of the deadly amtrak crash, does it really take a catastrophe to trigger action on public safety? that's the question we'll ask transportation secretary anthony foxx about the state of america's infrastructure which according to one senator is a matter of life and death. >> as a nation, we have fallen way out of pace with where we were in previous years in terms of overall investment. sglo. >> do you really think it's a fair implication that the lack of infrastructure spending is to blame for this accident? >> i think the lack of infrastructure spending is costing us lives in america.
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you're looking at live pictures on board an amtrak train this morning, the first train in the restored service between philadelphia and new york city. six days after that deadly derailment, full service along the northeast corridor is back this morning reopening a critical pipeline for commerce and travel. and joining us now from washington secretary anthony foxx of the u.s. department of transportation. good to have you on this morning. >> thank you me came pika. >> amtrak got up and running pretty quick. they installed automatic train control over the weekend? >> that's correct. we required amtrak to install automatic train control as well as to do inspections on the curves all along the northeast corridor. they have done that very carefully and we're confident the service should resume this morning. >> so not to confuse automatic train control which has been around for decades and decades and decades with positive train
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control, let's talk about that fix, if i could, because i have a couple of questions when you look at sort of the background here. you started at boston. given the fact that automatic train control could have prevented this accident, you look at boston 1990, 70 plus injured and federal railroad administration mandates that automatic train control is put in place on that curve. and a few others and it's done. and then you go to new york, 2013 the metro authority derailnorth derailment, four people died and fra says you must put automatic train control in that curve. they do it within weeks and a few others, as well. and now you have philadelphia just last week eight dead and automatic train control is installed over the weekend? this costs thousands not millions. so my question to you, sir, is why does it seem like the federal government is only acting when there is blood on the tracks?
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>> well, first of all, i have to say that the folks at amtrak have taken extraordinary measures over the last several days to not only clear the site, but also to take these steps that we've asked them to take. the fact of the matter is that we have challenges in this country with making sure these technologies get this place and we at the fra as well as d.o.t. have been working very carefully with amtrak to make sure not only atc but ptc gets installed by the end of the year. my understanding is that amtrak is on pace do that. >> but atc can prevent these derailments and it can be put in place quickly. and my question is why does it keep getting put in place after there are disasters? why is it not mandated across the board there. >> well, we're taking a look at taking additional steps beyond what we've taken and you can expect that over the next days and weeks, the fra as well as
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d.o.t. will continue taking steps to ensure innercity passenger rail in this country is setting a high bar for safety. >> i would take it the fra is the ash terp of safety at the very least. >> yes. >> so at this point, if automatic train control can prevent derailments like this and we see deaths and injuries thousand three that i can name to you and two in the past two years, one last week with eight dead why wouldn't it be put in place? it's not even expensive. it's not a money issue. >> well again, we are putting it in place today with the northbound trains going on the amtrak system. we are also taking additional looks at the system do ensure that we
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>> well, again, we still don't know the cause of this particular accident. there is still a lot of questions to be answered. but separate and apart from that, i can tell you that our infrastructure system needs more investment and we need to take a hard look at the policies that are in place as it relates to that infrastructure. this country is too great, we've been given too much to leave the next generation with a crumbling infrastructure infrastructure, with bridges that need repairs, with tracks that need to be replaced with rail systems that need to be improved. this country is too great to be where we are. >> it is. and so the question is, whether the cause was projectile -- we know the train was going 106 miles an hour. and we know we have the tech technology to prevent these derailments. will the entire season be updated in a reasonable amount of time not waiting for the next derailment? can you assure us of that? >> well, as i say, we are taking
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a look at the local picture. one of the things in the president's budget is almost a billion dollars annually to put in ptc across not only the amtrak system, but also -- >> how about automatic train control that costs a lot less? >> again deploy that today. again, amtrak will have to speak more for its own decisions on their part. but i'm telling you the fra has glanded that they put atc in place for of the northeast corridor and that's what is happening today. >> secretary anthony foxx, thank you for being on the show this morning. >> thank you. coming up, hillary clinton has been doing a lot of listening in the early weeks of her presidential campaign. but even some democrats want her to tindfind her voice and quick. we'll take a look at her swing through iowa. and tomorrow, robert gates will join us. meet the world's newest energy superpower. surprised?
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coming up on morning joe oig, a major city falls in iraq. how will isis' latest victory affect the u.s. effort to defeat the extremists? also senator john mccain joins the table the issue that apparently has him on the same side as president obama. plus it's the end of an era as "mad men" signs off the air. did did the series finally live up to the hype?
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and cloud and hosting services. centurylink. your link to what's next. the fight quickly escalated and moved into the parking lot. >> police say it began as a fist fight. >> at least nine gang members were killed and 18 others injured. >> probably one of the most
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violence gruesome scenes that i've seen. >> described him as like al capone's accountant. >> a bold raid into syria into an isis stronghold with u.s. boots on the ground. >> it is the kind of one-two punch that we should do more of. >> if i'm president of the united states, and you're thinking about joining al qaeda or isil, i'm not going to call the judge. i'm going to call a drone and we will kill you. >> you're looking for a perfect candidate, he probably existed two 2,000 years ago. >> after jeb bush spent the week stumbling over questions on the war, today marco rubio found himself doing the same thing. >> it was not a mistake for the president to go into iraq based on the information he was provided at president. >> and i thousand believe directing personal donations to that found days was a mistake. >> there is a rapidly spinning revolving door between politics and media. you have to pick your lane. >> most conservatives expect this. but i think he probably should exercised better judgment.
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>> welcome back to "morning joe." david is still with us. good. along with the host of msnbc's the last word, lawrence o'donnell. i'm still trying to figure out why the secretary of transportation came on television this morning. >> you know, i thought we were going to hear at least talking points. >> no, let me just tell you what i thought i was going to hear after four people died in the metro north derailment two years ago, and eight people died last week derailments that could have been prevented by technology that costs thousand not millions. technology has been around since the 30s or 40s. i thought we'd get an announcement that this technology would be put at every curve necessary to prevent these derailments from every happening again. why would you come on television to say we'll look into this and we'll do the best we can. like we did before? >> now they're saying that they will be on every curve that matters on the northeast corridor.
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>> so lawrence let's me show you how easy it is to install automatic train control. of course fra says amtrak could in the resume service until they got automatic -- guess where it is now? in place. >> on the big curves. >> over the weekend. over the weekend they installed it. so service is up and running today. and so if he was going to come on and say service is up and running, i'm not celebrating. i don't feel safe. eight people died last week and it could have been prevented. does anyone disagree with that shall. >> right. and by the way, here is the little problem with automatic train control what i learned last puig. the engineer can override it. the seat belt noise goes off in your car, imagine if there was a switch that you could go, bang, turn that noise off. that's why positive takes complete control. >> but this at least, it's not expensive. >> it's a great system. it does automatically shuts down the train. if they had had it on that curve
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if they were using it, this older technology would automatically have shut down and stopped the train. and it could have been on that curve and it could have been used. >> and it could have saved those people's lives. and so we have the secretary of transportation on this morning very nice guy he's always welcomed back. why? why even talk until you're going to do something real? >> kind of a no-brainer. >> kind of a no-brainer. >> well, your question too was the essential question which is why do you only install this stuff after a crash. every spot you isolated where they installed it was after a crash. >> blood on the tracks, let's prevent that curve from having that problem again. are we that behind the eight ball? are we that stupid? >> only thing i can think of is maybe we don't know which curves are the problem curves until somebody has an accident right? that's all i can think of. otherwise put it everywhere. i'm just guessing. >> okay. now, i'm thinking it's not that tough, but maybe these people
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are a lot smarter than us. i'm not feeling that way right now and i'm not feeling safe. our infrastructure looks ridiculous. it's old clunky and keeps derailing the trains to the point where people die and they fix things after. this is a joke. that was joke. >> and you just didn't get that sense of urgency or -- it didn't feel like the interview was that different from what he would have said to those questions a month ago. >> exactly. and everybody is pointing to someone else. amtrak, the ntsb, the fra. you know what, the government is the arbiter of the safety of our transportation system. i'm sorry. i'd say come to a morning show the morning after amtrak service is back on track with something extremely strong to say about how our tracks will be safe to ride on. or don't come on at all. okay? just don't. want it go to politics shall we? >> why don't we. >> the race for 2016, former
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florida governor jeb bush weighed in on the isis raid at an event in iowa on saturday laying blame for the creation of the radical group at the president's feet. >> it's encouraging that one of the isis leaders has been killed if it's been confirmed and kudo to the special forces the best in the world. having said that, this administration created the void that created this emerging caliphate that is far bigger than anything that existed before and there is no long term strategy on how to deal with it. >> bush was campaigning in iowa just days after announcing that he will not participate in this summer summer's straw poll. >> i'm here in iowa speaking about iowa for just to remind everybody, i'm going to -- if i go i don't understand the consideration of this, be an active candidate, i'll campaign hard here. i just don't do straw polls. >> and that night in des moines, bush joined other republican presidential hopefuls at a dinner for the party faithful a
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strict ten minute time limit forced each speaker to get straight to his or her point with most focusing on foreign policy and national security. one candidate not there florida senator marco rubio who faced tough questions about whether he's changed positions on the decision to invade iraq. >> six weeks ago, it made sense to invade iraq in 2003. thousand you say it was a mistake. >> no, two different questions. it was not a mistake. the president based on -- this is the way the real world works. the president based on the information provided -- >> but you were saying based on what we now know. >> based on what we know now, i wouldn't have thought man any pack wow would beat in that fight -- >> but you said -- >> it was not the same question. >> so it kept going for another minute and then here is how it ended. >> was it a mistake? >> it was not a mistake for the president to go into iraq based
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on the information he was provided as president. today where he know if we had -- if the president had known that there were no weapons of mass destruction at the time, you still would have had to deal with saddam hussein. the process would have been different. >> you know what is a hazing this war after all these years is the fulcrum for national politics.hazing, this war after all these years is the fulcrum for national politics. it helped launch barack obama, helped defeat hillary clinton and now messing up the candidates on the right. >> why are they so stumped? >> well, i thought you saw in those clips exactly what their problem is. they want to pin iraq problems on barack obama and the democrats. they want to say we were all in on iraq. at the same time they understand the country feels that going thisin was fundamentally a mistake and that's why you're seeing these multiple botched jobs as republicans try to talk about it. they're going two directions at
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once. and it will be interesting to see if they can figure it out. but as we get closer to prime time. >> lawrence, the country feels that going into iraq was -- maybe the country knows that going into iraq was a mistake. >> it does. that's the problem. the country those what the right answer is. so they have to struggle with the other thing. look, there are two questions that have emerged. one is the knowing what we know now version of the question. to which there is only once answer. and then there is this other version of the question, did george w. bush make a mistake. and marco rubio took that to be be a different question meaning the president's had this information at the time, he made the best choice he could on that information. that i think is the critical question. that's the more important question. because i think the question to a president is look we have just seen the united states go this to a war with faulty intelligence. your job, your desk, is the spot where all the intelligence comes and the decision is made. tell me how you will find your
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way to the right decision given that the intelligence is always faulty. we're they evernever going to give you perfect intelligence. will you make the decision they made in the bay of pigs in iraq, in vietnam? which decisions are you going to make. >> so on the democratic side we have this about hillary clinton. she's back campaigning in iowa today. financial disclosure forms released late friday show she and her husband earned more than $30 million since last january, last year, with more than $25 million coming from speaking fees. this as the former secretary of state is being criticized for taking -- only taking nine questions since the day she announced her candidacy. president obama's former top strategist david axelrod had this to say. >> i think she has to get out
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there, she has to answer questions and do it routinely so it's not a major news event when she takes a few questions. she has to do it quickly and start getting into the rhythm of the campaign where she's out there, she's answering questions, she's making speeches. and she's not, you know -- it would be a terrible mistake to not do that. >> has anyone noticed that the obama people, the guys who know how to win a presidential campaign on the democratic side have not found at one stage of hillary clinton's controversy, not at one point have they said she's doing exactly right. and these are the best strategists we know. they have never once said, yeah what she's doing this year is exactly right. >> she doesn't have to get out there. she just doesn't have to. >> she does. she just doesn't though it. >> i think snow itknow it. >> some strategists believe you can wait and tilt did t. when
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the campaign is getting serious and heating up. but i think they're banking on the fact that these questions will go away. it's like watching an armored car through iowa. it doesn't feel like a real campaign. and she can do that. she can afford do it for a while, i think. she's extremely popular in her party. and her name i.d. is through the roof. certain questions that aren't a concern for her. but it doesn't feel like an organic campaign despite the q&a sessions with the voters that they picked. >> and don't you think that it would be of tremendous benefit for her -- >> get to get roughed up and get out there. >> i've never actually strategized a successful campaign, but i won't let that stop me. i think the problem is i understand why when the clinton team looks at the polls they
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say, hey, what we should do nothing. i get that. the problem is she's a target every day and i don't know that they figured out how to deal with that. she's a target from republican candidates and also a target as a result of this unfolding story about the whole clinton foundation money world. and so a lot of articles coming up that essentially they either have decided we don't have to respond to because that's kind of baked into the polling numbers, and so i'm not sure -- i really -- i think they have a tough set of choices about how to handle all this. >> let's get to one other headline. the islamic state is celebrating a major victory in iraq while dealing with a set back in syria. isis is now in complete control of ramadi, which is located about 70 miles from baghdad. government forces fled following days of intense fighting. the u.s.-led coalition also launched air strikes in an unsuccessful bid to prevent ramadi from falling. this is being called the biggest
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victory for isis so far this year. but in syria a key leader of isis is dead and his wife is in custody after a daring raid by special operations forces. u.s. officials say the troops traveled from northern iraq in osprey helicopters. officials tell nbc news that gunfire was exchanged as well as hand to hand fighting. not much is known about abu sayyaf who is considered a top isis money man who hanged isis' oil and gas income and he personally was close to the isis leader al baghdadi. u.s. lawmakers are praising the operation, but also warning the u.s. must weigh the risks against the intelligence that was gathered. so joining us from seattle retired four star general barry mccaffrey. first, sir what do you think we
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gained out of that? >> well, i think it was again a demonstration of the enormous capacity of this jsop tool to use intelligence, collected in a variety of ways along with an air force team to get people in and out of defended targets. it was a good thing. it worked brilliantly. i'm sure over the coming weeks they will exploit a massive a of information, where was the oil going out of turkey who was handling it, how is the money. so i think it was a first rate operation. but i think that what has astonished me is the confusion of roles in congress and the administration wanting to hold hearings of how much risk was acceptable. that kind of operational detailer is the commanders. congress can't even get to the point on authorization use of military force. we've had 59,000 killed and
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wounded in iraq and afghanistan and here we're going to hold hearings on special ops raid that worked. >> david ignatius has a question for you, sir. >> general, i wanted to ask you about the other big news story of the weekend, the fall of ramadi. and ask you who you think is going to clear ramadi and fallujah, which is next door. u.s. marines fought house to house in those towns in the earlier campaign ten years ago. who will clear those areas now? >> well i was in ramadi multiple times and watched with great admiration like the marines and so-called sunni tribes that we bought their support accomplished. it was really remarkable. i don't think the iraqi arm can put iraq back together. it's phenomenal their incompetence, their lack of
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discipline kunlgcourage of connective ability to fight in the case of modest isis forces. so unlike congressman hurd, i lpszed listened to his comments, i think this is a big deal. hard to imagine that the shiite militias will do anything but further intensify the fractured nature of iraq with kurdish shia sunni bitter civil war going on for the last 15 years. >> general barry mccaffrey, thank you very much. also this abc news anchor george stephanopoulos has issued his third apology in less than a week for failing to disclose $75,000 in did he nations to the clinton foundation. he once again said it was a mistake to make the donations or disclose them while covering the foundation. but several journalists including former colleagues at abc news are questioning stephanopoulos' explanation saying he should have known better. >> i like george.
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i worked with him. and have great respect for him. but i wanted to just take him by the neck and say, george, what were you thinking. and clearly he was not thinking. i thought it was outrageous and i am sorry that again the public's trust in the media is being challenged and frayed because of the actions of some of the top people in the business. >> like carol, i was completely dumbfounded particularly in the interview with adviser. i couldn't believe as he was making the whole conversation about the foundation that it didn't occur to him to say maybe i should disclose that i've given them a lot of money and participated in a lot of their events. it simply is an indication that very smart people can sometimes be very foolish. i even think to what extent stephanopoulos was trying to repair relations with the clintons because the book he wrote in 1999 all too human
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put him on the outs with the clintons and not many people raised doubts about covering hillary clinton in 2008. >> you want to be seen as independent and if there is anybody in the world that you want to seem independent from, it's the clintons. so that's the mistake. the apology is fine. i like george. i think he's done a good job of being even handed in his work. but this was a mistake and i'm not sure he'll recover from it anytime soon. >> still ahead on "morning joe," he calls it the sxeshlgsexperience of a lifetime. ricky schroeder's 100 plus day journey in afghanistan for his brand new documentary series. and up next, where does "mad men" rank among the other great tv shows? we'll have that debate. huh, 15 minutes could save you 15% or more on car insurance. everybody knows that. well, did you know that game show hosts should only host game shows? samantha, do you take kevin as your lawfully wedded husband...
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scandalized my child. took another man's name and made -- nothing of it. >> that's not true. >> i only called because i'm -- i realized i never said good-bye to you. >> i don't think you should be alone right now. >> i'm in a crowd. i just wanted to hear your voice. see you soon. >> wait. >> that was a scene from last night's series finale of "mad men." and joining us now media and tv reporter for the "los angeles
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times." good to have you on board. joe, i know what you were watching last night. >> yeah. steven, let me ask you some of the greatest shows in television history have ended with a dud. mash most memorably this most critics eyes. how did "mad men" manage their exit from the stage? >> i thought the last two minutes of the show were great. i thought -- i don't know how much we can give away. >> let's make a decision right now. joe, should we disclose or not? >> if you haven't seen "mad men," turn off the channel, okay? we're doing this in real tile.me. go ahead. >> that last scene where we see don going from meditation to the famous coca-cola commercial, i'd like to teach the world to sing, from the early 1970s, to me it was sort of the triumph of
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consumerism. look at all the subversive ideas that these people lived through and they were able to take every one and use to sell products and that continued after the 1960s. to me this willh in my mind, it made so much sense. don went back and worked on the coke campaign and that's what he came up with. i thought the rest of the episode was not great. i think it had one of the ors tv hookups in history. >> what was that? >> with peggy and the art director. that's not something that we were hoping would happen. >> a great line. >> so in the end i think it made tremendous sense. a friend sent me an e-mail and says it reminds me of the old george burns line that acting is about honesty. once you can fake that, you've got it made.
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that was don draper. >> okay. joe, jump in. >> well we'll continue to debate the end. but how does "mad men" stack up with other series in tv history, most recently i think safe to say the new golden age of television over the past decade. >> it's up there. i think it would be in the top ten, but i think for a specific reason. i mean, i think sopranos is the best series of all time and this certainly built off of the foundation of the sopranos. and coming up with a show that had complex story telling that had an anti-hero, that told the story in a novel list tick style. and it was really became like a work of art that you could look at like a novel or a great play. so i think it worked on that level. what was also very important about "mad men" was that it didn't reach a broad audience, but it was focused on the right
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audience. madison avenue liked it because it was about them. journalists liked opinion naturers. it gave us a new look into mid century ideas and design and fashion. isn't it interesting that the show ends in 1970? >> that's great analysis. >> the show ends in 1970 and now the fashions of 1970 are what will be popular this year. >> joe i get the impression that the ending did that hit your hot button. aim am i accurate? >> well, no i thought that the entire -- about three quarters of the way through joey and i were watching it, just looked at each other and said what the hell. i think it was a disappointing if i that willy. >> that was joe's tweet by the way, what the hell. >> that was it. it was what the hell.
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it was a disappointing finale. i think, hethough, at the end, every other character had pat endings. everybody tied up neatly in a bow except the person who was at the center of it all don. and at the end, no redemption for don. very little growth from the very beginning. and i suppose that's maybe matthew's cynicism won out in the end. >> i don't know about the no redemption for don. that final scene, that's a changed character. that's not a moment he had anywhere else in the -- >> he turns a spiritual experience into a coke ad. >> he goes there to try to find himself. great ad men are wired this way. that's how they see the world. that's how they express themselves. this was who he is. >> what we don't know, we don't
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know what that entry in to spiritualism and actually getting in touch with himself ended up doing in his personal life. when he hugs that guy -- well see, i feel sort of like -- because people don't watch this live anymore. so joe set the rules. we can talk. when he hugs that guy in that session, that is a break-through moment for a character. that has never happened. nothing like that's happened for him in the entire series. that moment says to you this is a different man. and so if you think that the same person goes from that lawn in big sur back on madison avenue and comes back the same way, i don't think you get what happened in that final hour. >> thank you for being elitist and looking down the end of your nose at me, but this is a cycle matthew weiner has taken us on for several years. don had redemption at the end of the last show where he gave his
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automobile to a struggling kid that he was giving a second chance to. oh don's cleaned up! 15 minutes in to the next show, he's drop dead drunk. >> wlenl you havehen you have your spiritual awakening, you'll understand this. >> i'll tell you what, when i do have the spiritual awakening i'm pretty sure i won't score it based on your standards. now to mike barnicle. mike, you go -- just joking. mike, you asked me what i thought. what did you think ever theof the last episode? >> i thought don remained true to character and it encapsulated his character in an unchanging really at its core and encapsulated with the slight smirk at the end of the show. cynical to the core. >> exactly. a smirk. >> and he was going to do the coke commercial. >> steven, final thoughts. >> it shows you that how
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television has really transformed. we had -- people have shows now that you just can't be another show on the air that you'll passively watch. people have to be engaged by tv shows because there are so many ways to experience them and the consumer has so many choices. viewer has so many choices. "mad men" shows that you just can't be good. you have to be important. you have to get people to really care about your tv show now to go forward in this really crowded landscape. >> great yessing of the ingquiing writing allows us to write the rest of the story. we all get to write our own version. >> so joe, write it. >> well i think everybody knows he goes back to new york he does the coke ad. >> every agrees on that. but we don't know whether he goes then and has a successful marriage gets a good relationship with his kids. we don't know all that. >> i think it's probably more of the same. >> yeah, past is always prologue. it's more of the same.
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he had he redemption shon at the end of the last episode he was drunk halfway through the other one. but anyway steven, the subtlety of don's final smirk is the greatest written dough into his soul. it reminded that last moment in castaway where he saw tom hanks look down the road and you knew everything was going to be all right with that character. that was the genius. >> and it also said he was going to survive. i think that throughout the series matthew weiner got us down that road that we were going to he said up with something terrible here. i mean you see him racing cars at the beginning of the fayinale and you think they will james dean him or something. and don always found a way out. he always found a way to get to the next point. >> all right.
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steven about a taking leo thank you very much. want to come back thursday is this. >> sure. >> let's do it. lawrence o'donnell thank you, as well. coming up senator mccain will weigh in on the fall of are a hadi. hey america, still not sure whether to stay or go to your people? ♪ well this summer, stay with choice hotels twice and get a $50 gift card you can use for just about anything. go you always have a choice.
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it's not symbolic, it's not been declared part of the caliphate on one hand or central to the future of iraq. but we want to get it back. >> that was joint chiefs chairman general martin dempsey last month when he was talking about the battle for ramadi. that city is now in isis control and with us to talk about that, chairman of the armed services committee, republican senator john mccain of arizona. senator mccain how significant do you feel the fall of ramadi is? >> i think it unfortunately is terribly significant. capital of anbar province. the deaths of hundreds. displacement of thousands and thousands. look, joe, we can till people we proved that with the wonderful operation that took out bin laden. we've been able to wipe out a number of the leadership there,
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these spectacular events which has great professionalism and skill of our military. but meanwhile, the fall of ramadi, i mean, it's huge. and the impact on psychology of the people of iraq. and finally the prime minister has said they will send should you a oig militia. shia made lishilitia is thousandnow controlled by iranians. it's the same shia militia that we fought against during the surge thanks to david petraeus we defeated them once. and i hate to be repetitious, but the fact is that thanks to the surge, we had it under control and this is another consequence of the failure of this administration and this president to leave a residual force behind. now you've seen virtually
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everybody who has talked to you this morning have all said that we need more boots on the ground. not the 82nd airborne, but we'll have to have more people on the ground. and this is really serious the fall of ramadi. >> joe next question. >> senator general mccaffrey was talking about what we've scratched our heads about on this show over the past couple of years just how bad the iraqi armed forces is. why it is that they can never stand up and fight for themselves. that limits us severely. what do we do? >> well, the options are much more limited than they were some time ago. the problem is that when we left there was a vacuum. maliki decided to control the armed services. he fired all of his good people and hollowed out the army and then we have this consequence of a collapse.
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the fall of hoe sul wasmosul was the best example. and now ramadi. i don't know how much equipment, capabilities army tanks, humvees. so we'll have to start all over i think on training the iraqi military and have a kind of a change this change in attitude on the pat of iraqis that makes them understand the importance of good leadership and good training. >> and investment back in iraq. so putting that on one track in terms of the fight against isis and trying to figure out how iraq can take care of itself at some point, and this major blow with the fall of ramadi, now let's move to the special operations raid in syria. how much it we get out of that? we had a republican congressman on earlier saying we need more of these hand to hand combat. i mean, this is a departure, is
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it not? >> i agree that we need more of it and queefwe've been doing this kind of thing. that's why we have drones and surveillance capability and we've been doing these for quite some time. most spectacular obviously was the raid that took out bin laden. but that is almost peripheral. if you're going to lose the capital of the province, but again, i don't want to denigrate the incredible job and coordination mockamongst our military, this operation where we didn't lose a person. you have to give them utmost praise. but to somehow assume that that will turn the tide here against isis i think is just not realistic. >> mike barnicle. >> we keep hearing, senator indications, calls for more boots on the ground more american troops whether trainers or whatever on the ground. this is in a region that you well know is one long extended
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fuse lit at both ends. what are the prospects, the hopes for getting countries like jordan and turkey more involved in this fight against isis which certainly threatens them far more immediately than it does us? >> well, one of the biggest problems here is that the fact that the turks and others view iran as a greater threat than isis. and unless we are willing to allow these people -- for example, people trained to go in and take down assad, then they won't cooperate. if we said to the turks tomorrow we'll take out isis and help take out bashir assad through no-fly zone and through other assistance, use of for example turkish air base for our air operations, by the way now 6 1/2 hour flight from an aircraft carrier over syria and back to about a 45 minute flight it
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would be, then i think you would get a lot more cooperation from them. and unfortunately, our focus seems to be only on isis while we see iran four countries, yemen will iraq syria and lebanon, basically in control. you could argue that right now the major influence in baghdad is not the united states by far that it's the iranians. >> final question from joe. >> yeah, senator barack obama said assad must go. he's changed his policy obviously at least in- deed if not word. how difficult would it be to push assad out of power and how important is to solving the entire crisis in the middle east in your opinion? >> one of the seminal events was when the president turned down the advice of his national security -- top national
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security team and equipping the free syrian army. now you're seeing a very unusual thing happening and that is that the islamic group, what is left of the moderate free syrian army, have joined forces and they are beginning to achieve military successes. bashir assad is running out of people. more and more iranian presence is in assad government and running the campaign there. so it's really interesting and we may be faced with this terrible unacceptable choice. you wants a assad or radical islamic group governing syria. that's what happens when we dispindis discontinue our engagement. >> senator john mccain, thank you. >> thanks for having me on. interesting times. >> and sorry joe spoiled the last episode of mad then oig"mad men" for you. >> you again wrecked my evening.
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>> it's not the first time senator. and certainly would the ben't be the last. but we love having you on. >> thank you senator mccain. right back with much more "morning joe." % ♪ roundup ♪ ♪ i'm a loving husband and a real good dad ♪ ♪ but weeds just make me rattlesnake mad ♪ ♪ well roundup has a sharp-shootin' wand ♪ ♪ i'm sendin' them weeds to the great beyond ♪ ♪ roundup ♪ yeha! [ whip cracks ] ♪ ♪ ♪ no need to pump just point and shoot ♪ ♪ hit 'em in the leaves and it kills to the root ♪ ♪ 'round fences, trees, even mulched beds ♪ ♪ 'cause the only good weed is a weed that's dead ♪ ♪ roundup ♪ yeha! [ whip
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all from a trusted it partner. centurylink. your link to what's next. . still ahead ricky schroeder as you've never seen him before. did you know he grew up wanting to be a soldier? we'll ask him about the time he tried to enlist. he joins the table next. my school reunion. i don't know.
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coming in this way. probably won't see him, though. >> less than two minutes. >> oh here we go. that was a scene from a new six-part documentary series called "the fighting season," premiering tonight on directv's audience network. joining us now, actor and producer ricky schroder who spent over 100 days encamped with american troops in afghanistan filming the series. this looks great. let's back up to how this started because it's not the usual sort of way things get booked. this is you and a friend saying "i want to go do something" and putting yourselves out there. how did you decide to do this? >> it's america's longest war, afghanistan. four years longer at this point than vietnam and john paul dejoria, one of my partners and
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i, thought it was important to document what the ending of a war looks like. we've seen the beginnings of wars but it's complicated, it's messy, it's hard to end a war especially in that country. and so we chipped in together, went 50-50 and i made it over there and we came back with 650 hours of footage and crafted it into a six-hour series directv is putting out. >> two questions -- why did you want to do this and how did you get hooked up with the 10th mountain division? >> so why i wanted to do it was it was important to document what we left that country like, in my opinion. it's been such a part of our consciousness, afghanistan. so many people have sacrificed there so much that it was important to document how it is we leave it and whatever happens in that country, good or bad, we can reference this project from the soldiers' perspective to show what it was like when we left. and i think, you know, also the
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bigger debate of nation building is one our country will have. so it was important to see what the state of afghanistan was, what we did accomplish and what we didn't. >> looking at the access you got, it looks very -- first of all, it's shot incredibly. >> thank you. >> you said we'll see things in here we've never seen before. give us a teaser on what's that. >> you're going to see the wise use of military power from the perspective of the men who sort of develop intelligence and then plan operations using drones and how they target and whether they move forward with the strikes or not. it's an interesting perspective. 10th mountain was one of the units we were with. we were also with 82nd airborne task force white devil, we were with the kabul police embedded in the kabul p.d. so we look at the war from the commanders to the specialists out there, tip of the spear kind of guy. >> real quick? >> so you find out that war
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isn't a video game like most americans think of it as now huh? >> it's absolutely not a video game. it's a complex process. the men who fight it are very good at it. we were in some battles and we got to see how they coordinated the asset wes had whether they bill artillery mortars air weapons team to overmatch the enemy. and it's tough to find the enemy because he's a farmer by day and taliban when he decides to be. >> so i love -- you set out to tell a story, and an important one, you brought this project to directv, e-mailed them out of the blue, the deal was done in a 30-minute call 18 hours later. that's impressive. check out the premier of "the at 9:00 eastern on directv's audience network. ricky schroder thank you very much. coming up at the top of the hour, a daring raid by u.s. special forces takes out the man known as isis' money man.
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the details on the operation and what it means for the fight against the terror group. plus, first jeb bush now marco rubio? why the iraq war is still creating problems for republican hopefuls for 2016. we'll be right back with much more "morning joe." (music) boys? stop less. go more. the passat tdi clean diesel with up to 814 hwy miles per tank. just one reason volkswagen is the #1 selling diesel car brand in america. ♪ want to survive a crazy busy day? start with a positive attitude... and positively radiant skin. aveeno® positively radiant moisturizer... with active naturals® soy.
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on set we have nikonck confessore and here mike barnicle. u.s. officials say troops traveled from northern iraq in black hawk helicopters and osprey aircraft like these. it's the second time u.s. special operations forces carried out a mission in isis isis-controlled territory in syria. not much is known about abu sayyaf. he was considered a top isis money man who managed isis' oil and gas income and he was personally close to the isis leader abu bakr al-baghdadi. but isis is celebrating a major victory in iraq which may be a bigger problem here. joining us from london, nbc news chief global correspondent bill neely. bill what's the significance of the fall of ramadi? >> good morning, mika. i think the news from ramadi somewhat trumps that from syria. ramadi is a disaster in three
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part s secondly, it's the manner of the defeat. iraq's security forces proving how utterly incompetent they can be. by all accounts, their retreat from ramadi was complete chaos. thirdly, the consequences. not just that isis has the momentum and weapons and that it's 70 miles or closer from baghdad but also the prospect that shi'a militia some of them iranian backed, are the only way that ramadi can be got back into goth hands. that raises all sorts of prospects include willing the u.s. continue bombing ramadi in support of iranian-backed militias? if you look at it as the glass half full, you might say that for that last year and a half ramadi has been surrounded and therefore it was only a matter
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of time before it fell and john kerry has been saying much the same thing this morning saying, look isis' movements, its finances, its personnel have been stopped and he's absolutely confident that ramadi will be retaken. but that could really take some time, even if you are as optimistic as john kerry is. >> nbc's bill neely, thank you. david ignatius, here's what the "wall street journal" says, and i'm not sure i completely disagree here. "if iraqi forces can't hold ramadi, they're a long way from recapturing the city of mosul which has been under isis control for nearly a year. ramadi's fall undercuts white house and pentagon assurances that the war against islamic state is going well." david? >> i think that's a fair assessment. this has been the battle that we -- the u.s. coalition -- was ready to fight next. they said no we're not going to mosul, we're going to anbar province. and anbar province's capital,
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ramadi, has now fallen a few months after that declaration. and it's fallen because the people that we have been saying are going to do the fighting, the iraqimilitias simply aren't ready. so in desperation they're calling on the people we don't want to do the fighting, the shi'a militias. it's not a good situation at all. this was a weekend when you saw u.s. military power at its most effective in the raid that captured abu sigh i can't haveayyaf in southeastern syria, killing him, capturing his wife and getting enormous amounts of intelligence to fuel further raids, but you also saw the weaknesses in our strategy in the ramadi fall. >> david, the raid within syria obviously we're in awe of the skill and the courage of the special forces units. but what real significance does this have? does it means that we now have better on-ground intelligence than we have had previously within syria? >> it appears to be a fusion of better on-ground intelligence,
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better human intelligence, and better use of surveillance drones, other overhead assets that can help us see and listen. it looks to me like the beginning of the cycle of night raids that became so familiar in iraq where you come in, u.s. forces come in in the dark of night, conduct attacks and take away troves of intelligence that then fuel more attacks. the iraqis the islamic state can't know what was taken from abu sayyaf's lair. they can't know what abu sayyaf's wife will tell coalition interrogators so they're now in a state of uncertainty, which is unusual for them. but as you say, this is u.s. military operations at their most aggressive and effective. imagine if one of those special operations soldiers had been captured what we'd be looking at this morning. >> back across the border in iraq ramadi.
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ramadi falls. what does this portend for american relationships with iran? seeing that iran controls militias that apparently have a fighting capacity that the iraqi army does not have. >> well, we've known that the iranian militias are tough and at the end of the day the iranian militias were not strong enough to take tikrit to the east. so there are limits on their power. i don't think the sunni residents of ramadi will tolerate that area being taken over by shiite militias. that's another step down the road. what troubles me, mike, is a year after mosul was overrun, a year in which we've been talking about building up sunni capability we're no closer to doing than that we were. that should concern people. this is a strategy we've announced it just isn't working. that's what we saw other the weekend. not happening.
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>> so former florida governor jeb bush weighed in on the weekend's isis raid at an event in iowa on saturday laying blame for the reunited nations of the radical group at the president's feet. >> >> it's encouraging one of the senior isis leaders has been killed. kudos to the best special forces in the world. having said that, this administration created the void that created this emerging caliphate that's far bigger than anything that existed before and there is no long-term strategy on how to deal with it. >> bush was campaigning in iowa days after announcing he will not participate in this summer's straw poll there, dismissing rumors he won't be competing there at all. >> i'm here in iowa speaking about iowa just to remind everybody if i go beyond the consideration to be an active candidate, i'll campaign hard here. i don't do straw polls. >> and that night in des moines bush joined other republican presidential hopefuls at a
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dinner for the party faithful. a strict ten-minute time limit forced each speaker to get straight to his or her point with most focusing on foreign policy and national security. >> if i'm president of the united states and you're thinking about joining al qaeda or isil -- anybody thinking about that? i'm not going to call a judge, i'm going to call a drone and we will kill you. >> okay. there's one way of looking at things. how about another one? one candidate who was not there, florida senator marco rubio faced tough questions about whether he's changed positions on the decision to invade iraq. >> six weeks ago it made sense to invade iraq in 2003, now you say it was a mistake. >> no two different questions. it was not a mistake. the president based on -- this is the way the real world works. the president based on the information that was provided by -- >> but you said based on the information -- he was saying based on what we know now.
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>> well, based on what we know now, i wouldn't have thought manny pacquiao was going to beat in that fight a couple weeks ago. >> but you were asked the same question and you said -- >> no, it was not the same question. >> that went on for another painful minute and then it closed like this. >> was it a mistake? >> it was not a mistake for the president to go into iraq based on the information he was provided by as president. today we know -- if the president had known that there were no weapons of mass destruction at the time, you still would have had to deal with saddam hussein, but the process would have been different. >> nick, he was doing well. what happened here? why is this so confounding? >> it seems he has some bad intel on the boxing match, too. but look, what's happening here is the guys who beat the drum for the iraq war who were the architects are still around and are still the foreign policy establishment of the gop. so these candidates are being pulled back and forth between
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the leaders in their own party who are conservative on foreign policy and the people of the country who think this was a terrible mistake including republican, and don't want to hear a defense of it. and the problem is there are donors who think it's a good idea and don't want to hear these guys backing down, either. >> well, there's a lot of them. joining us from washington msnbc political correspondent kasie hunt. you've been following the republicans all weekend long. marco rubio getting stumped on that one key question. it's not the only thing that happened this weekend. and there seem to be more and more candidates lining up kasie. >> you saw if unsettled nature of this field and the republicans increasingly are starting to get nervous about how this field ultimately could play out. i think everybody was hoping for a process that was going to go the opposite of what we saw in 2012 that narrowed down quickly that allowed them to unify
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behind somebody. you saw jeb bush in iowa. he's had a testy couple of days. there's a lot of sensing blood in the water around that giving these people a lift. i was surprised rubio took that tack in that interview. it doesn't come across as though he's sure of himself. >> at this point there's not a wrong answer to the question. the "washington post" reports republican party leaders are becoming increasingly worried of the number of candidates likely to run for the white house. with no clear front-runner, some fear the primary battle could stretch into the spring of 2016, costing the party tens of millions of dollars and moving the eventual nominee even further to the right. which would look kind of like
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the other election, one we've just seen. so far six candidates have formally entered the race. another three have potential announcement dates set, at least another seven have formed committees and organizations exploring bids and a straw poll the party launched online last week lists a whopping 36 potential candidates although some of those listed have ruled out bids. help me out here. nick? >> i love who's on that list. >> what are they thinking? >> i think there's a post-modern quality to this. it takes a lot less to run for president than in the past. if you have a social media following and you're on tv often enough and you can put some gas in your car and drive around iowa and new hampshire for a year you can be a candidate for president. so the barrier to entry is low and further more if you have a billionaire friend who will pump some money into a super pac you can go on for longer.
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>> it gets to the on seinesy of the o campaign itself, the aforementioned nicholas confessore points out that these campaigns, faux campaigns as well as actual campaigns right now, here's the paragraph "their campaigns are in practice intricate constellations of political committees, super pacs and tax-exempt groups engineered to avoid fund-raising restrictions imposed on candidates and their parties after the watergate scandal." so we have this reservoir this tsunami of money infecting our politics and this is what we get. >> think of all the people jeb bush has hired. a campaign manager field people, press people, fund-raisers. he's out there in iowa yet he's not running if president and according to him and his campaign and, in fact, he's not subject, he says -- >> well, he can't say yet. >> he says he isn't even exploring a bid for the presidency because that would also pull him under the fund-raising rule. still ahead on "morning
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joe," a police sergeant says it's the worst crime scene he has seen in more than 30 years. the biker brawl that left nine people dead and more than a dozen injured. plus there will be a new vehicle hitting the street this summer. why it may be a matter of weeks before you see google's self-driving cars on the road. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. nervous whitening will damage your teeth? introducing listerine® healthy white™. it not only safely whitens teeth... ...but also restores enamel. lose the nerves
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time to take a look at the morning papers. the waco tribune herald. nine people are dead and 18 more injured after a confrontation on sunday in waco texas between rival biker gangs and a police shootout. it happened outside the twin
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peaks restaurant in waco located in a popular shopping center. police say eight people died at the scene one more died at a nearby hospital, but no police officers or bystanders were injured, unbelievably. the fight apparently broke out at the restaurant's bathroom before spilling out into the bar and finally into the parking lot where the shooting began. waco police had learned beforehand that at least five rival gangs and up to 200 members from across texas were gathering at the restaurant so they had officers waiting nearby in case of violence. the sergeant said at least 100 individuals have been detained in the investigation. the "chicago tribune," there is growing criticism after an egyptian court sentenced the country's first freely elected leader to death. the court recommended the punishment for former president mohamed morsi and more than 100 muslim brotherhood supporters. the sentence is in connection two a mass prison break in 2011. it's the latest in a series of mass death sentences since morsi
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was removed from power almost two years ago. but a state department official says the mass death sentence is inconsistent with the rule of law and the u.s. is deeply concerned. david, former president morsi sentenced to death in egypt. i mean, the arab spring has now turned into a continuing, rolling middle east nightmare. no? >> you know, i find this really very sad. here's the first democratically elected president in egypt. he may not have been doing a very good job but to have him deposed by the military an then sentenced to death should really chill egyptians. this sentence can be commuted both by religious authorities and even by president al sisi, the current reigning president in egypt. i hope so. it does send a terrible signal to the arab world as a whole as to what egypt's new government is all about. >> what is it all about? what is the ruling junta?
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>> in part mike it's about taking revenge for these actions of the muslim brotherhood. the egyptian military has been fighting the muslim brotherhood for all of the lives of the current core of officers and soldiers. it seems to be ingrained in them as their prerogative, their basic mission and they don't seem to have a good governor to regulate their actions and that death sentence is the latest example. other papers now, the "new york times." two women who were once strangers at columbia university discovered they were actually sisters. they were born to the same teen mom in florida in the 1980s and raised by adopted families in different parts of the country. but during introductions at a college writing class they found out they had a lot in common and since that first meeting, the sisters have become very close, spending holidays together and finally meeting their birth mother in florida. what a story.
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>> that was an amazing story. amazing. "sports illustrated." despite torrential rain and a sloppy track, kentucky derby winner american pharaoh finished seven lengths ahead of his competitors to win the preakness. the three-year-old colt is two-thirds of the way to a potential triple crown title. if he can win the belmont stakes on june 6, he'll be the first triple crown winner since 1978. msnbc.com former republican presidential candidate mitt romney scared off against five time heavyweight champion of the world -- really? >> yeah yeah. >> why did he do this? >> charity. >> friday night for a much-hyped charity fight. romney entered the ring to the song "i will survive" led by his wife ann romney. okay loving them. he was theeatrically stripped of a shirt and tie so he could box shirtless and the real winner was charity vision. the event raised over $1 million for the nonprofit which provides
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surgeries for the blind around the world. kasie, you were there. you sent me a picture. you were wearing awesome pink boxing gloves. i think you were fighting mid- inging mitt, too. is that possible? >> i covered romney for 18 months in his presidential bid in 2012 so i suggested that we do a little bit of sparring, ann romney helped him into his gloves and said "we've been waiting to do this for years." >> she's so funny. >> but he only took his shirt off because evander holyfield told him he had to. he said he was going to wear a muscle t-shirt otherwise but holyfield said "dude, that's not how you do it." >> he wears it well. that's nice and that's fun. why not. thank you, kasie. mike barnicle? >>. "usa today" russian president vladimir putin scored eight goals in sochi as his hockey team played an exhibition game. the team featured former nhl
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players and won 18-6. this is the second time putin has played in an exhibition game. he scored six goals and five assists last march. that's like a triple hat trick he scored. and the goalie obviously just waved the pucks right in the net. >> all right. coming up on "morning joe," this high school senior got into eight ivy league schools eight. all eight. and he rejected each and every one. why did he do that? we'll tell you which school he'll gol to instead. plus, the computer expert who claimed he hacked into an airplane's control system and made it fly sideways. now the fbi is investigating. we'll be right back. just stay calm and move as quietly as possible. no sudden movements. google search: bodega beach house.
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welcome back to "morning joe." we're back with mike barnicle and news and finance anchor at yahoo! bianna golodryga. first i want to show you guys something here. remember i talked about the plane that could go sideways because the guy was hacking? the fbi is investigating a claim made by a computer security expert who says he hacked into an airliner's inflight entertainment system and briefly made the plane fly sideways. denver computer security expert chris roberts told the fbi he hacked in-flight entertainment systems 15 to 20 times and at one point took control of a plane's engine. is this possible? joining us from the cockpit of a
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jet in ft. lauderdale, florida, nbc news correspondent carey sanders. carey, where is the fbi at this point in terms of verifying this claim? >> well, the hacker was taken not into custody but he was detained and when he was detained they took all of the equipment that he had. they took his computer, his laptop, they took his hard drives, his thumb drives all of the cables. but they also note in the affidavit that all of that needs to be decrypted to look at it because it's encrypted. so that part of the investigation is still ongoing. but it seems hard to believe that somebody in the back of the plane, in a passenger seat could somehow take control of the avionics and the computers up here in the cockpit of a plane. but this morning, as you noted, he claims he did that by tunnelling through the entertainment system, which is in the seat back of the seat in front of you, that little television, that he did it go t up here and he claims, indeed, that he was able to briefly take control of the plane and now the
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fbi and united airlines are taking this seriously. >> we're trying to make the system safer better and more secure. >> reporter: chris roberts either is a hacker who has uncovered a dangerous back door that could allow a passenger to take control of a plane. >> it is definitely possible to manipulate the electronics through the in-flight entertainment system and satellite communications to get to the avionics of an airplane. >> reporter: or an exaggerator needlessly scaring the flying public. the fbi says in a fewly public affidavit roberts claims he hacked into a plane's entertainment system up to 20 times and in one case caused one of the airplane engines to climb, resulting in lateral or sideways movement of the plane. while agents continue to look for evidence of that, the fbi issued a statement to nbc news late sunday "there is no credible information to suggest an airplane's flight control system can be accessed or manipulated from its in-flight
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entertainment system." roberts has now stopped giving interviews, but on sunday tweeted "my only interest has been to improve aircraft security." but there's widespread skepticism about his claim. recently retired commercial airline pilot jim tillman. >> the folks at airbus and bowing are far too splart to create some system like that. it's ridiculous. >> reporter: tech writer bob sullivan is also skeptical but -- >> there is a long history of computer hackers on the right side of things tinkering around the edges of the law and we don't want to shoot the messenger when the messenger has an important security problem to talk about. >> i'm inside the plane owned by trinity air ambulance. they don't have this inflight entertainment system but they allowed us in here to show how advanced and computerized cockpits have become. meantime, the gao has just released a report that says that
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internet connectivity in the cockpit of planes to the outside world should be considered a threat and they say -- their words not mine -- it should be considered open to malicious activity which i suspect means open to potential terrorism. mika? >> kerry sanders, thank you very much. we'll follow that story. now we move on to the story of ronald nelson the memphis high school student who did something that's rare in the world of college admissions. he was accepted to all eight ivy league schools -- all eight, can you imagine that? then he did something rarer -- he turned them down. ronald joins us now. ronald congratulations, first of all. >> thank you so much. >> secondly, where did you/k decide to go? >> i'm going to go to the university of alabama, if you haven't heard already. >> roll tide. what can i say? >> definitely. >> what a great choice. i've been down there a couple times, the campus is beautiful, it looks like an ivy especially
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square with the dorms and i ran all the steps of the stadium. the only problem with alabama -- and you might want to rethink this, but there's one alum who sits on the set of this show everyday. joe, jump in. >> well, you know, first of all, we're reading this. we got this from business insider and saw you all over tv. the headline says "the kid that got into every ivy is going to the university of alabama and it's a brilliant decision." tell us why you made this unusual decision. >> well, when i first started applying to all the colleges i applied to, i wanted to make sure i wasn't closing any doors whatsoever, just trying to keep everything open and ultimately when i got back all of my acceptance letters at that point it was just determining the next step in any analysis which was figuring out, okay, where am i going to get the best education possible while still making sure that it's financially reasonable for both
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me and my family. and with the wonderful honors program i got into at the university of alabama and also the generous financial aid awards that i got from the university of alabama for merit scholarships it just seemed like it was the best option for me and i'm pleased with my decision. >> wow mike? >> mika we've been hearing and we've talked for some time over the past several years how we've been hearing more and more when we go out people talking about their children looking at ivy league schools, looking at schools across the northeast and the acc, but mika, we keep hearing alabama coming up time and time again. you say it all the time. >> i met people in washington, in very elite circles whose kids go to alabama and are super psyched about going there. that it's really become kind of like -- i don't know if when i was growing fun this dates me but uva kind of had that status now alabama is grabbing on to it. >> ronald, how many of these schools did you personally visit? >> i didn't get to visit all of
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them but i did try to get as many as possible because you know throughout the year i'm really heavily involved in my school's band program and also student government. so it became difficult to find time away from school because i have to graduate. i have of the deal do school work and get everything done. so throughout the springtime i was basically booked with all state music competitions regional things that i had to do. so it made it difficult to visit the schools. >> i was wondering if among the schools you visited, was it one student population that attracted you to the school more than another? or one student population that repelled you from going to a school? >> well, nothing really repelled me from anywhere at all. but i'd say definitely the student population that of course attracted me the most was the university of alabama and that happened when i went to the university fellows experience weekend for their final round of interviews because it was amazing being around so many of those students who just really cared about the world and very specific field of study and what
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they wanted to do. i thought that was going to end up being a great environment for me to be at. >> ronald congratulations to you. as one state school graduate who's married to a graduate from an ivy league i've always had a chip on my shoulder but there's something special about the state school environment. can you talk about the interactions you've had with teachers and students there? >> well, i noticed that when i was there i actually got to talk to the biology professor and he told me that he did some of his graduate work at columbia and that he didn't feel that he had as great of a -- he felt like he had a solid relationship with his professor but he really wanted to make sure that he was having a really really strong relationship with all of his students students. and he explained to me that that's the mind-set of the professors they have there. they want to make sure they're really involving all of their students making sure they're getting research in doing summer internships and i especially think i'll be able to accomplish that through the fellows experience because i'll
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work so closely with the dean of the honors college there. >> ronald thank you so much. congratulations and from one alabama guy to another, roll tide. we appreciate it. >> thank you so much. and roll tide to all of you. >> mika, you know the business insider was talking about the massive debt ronald is going to be avoiding by going through a state school like alabama. i will tell you i took joey out inof nyu and told him i was going to send him to the happiest place on earth. >> i remember that. >> he wasn't happy about it but he was miserable at nyu. sometimes we're always caught up in the rat race and wanting to get what's number one or two on this list. we forget there's more than just reputation and word of mouth. some kids are going to thrive in different environments. >> when we went there the few times i was really impressed with the students and the
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campus. so that's a cool story. still ahead, we'll be right back with what to expect on wall street today and a full recap of friday's "know your value" event. it was a good one.
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we help them fight the good fight. cvs health, because health is everything. >> makes sense think about it. what if, for example you're eating something larger than your head, as usual, and you start to choke? obviously genie can't get her arms around you to do the heimlich so she calls me i rush over, let myself in and we both watch you choke to death. >> what's it like to be your age and still have acne? >> are you two fighting again? >> no. in fact, i was just asking jim about his bible reading. >> jim read the bible? >> catholics don't need to read the bible. they's why they give us cliff notes on sunday. >> and what is this picture of you holding a bible the size of a child's coffin doing on the huffington post? congratulations, you made the front page next to a story about miley cyrus' tongue. >> entertainers of faith, funny man jim gaffe ban isn't ashamed
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of his faith. he's seen here leaving with his bible. >> daddy stop watching tv. >> it turns your brain to mush. >> i'm doing research. get daddy another bagel. >> it's refreshing to see a comedian not afraid of his faith, although what kind of knucklehead would put a holy text in a garbage bag? >> come on! i always thought that gaffe ban guy was weird. >> i did didn't i? those are the scenes from the jim gafferiigan show. he's hilarious. time now for business before the bell with cnbc's sara eisen. sara, what will be moving the market this is week? >> a lot of deal action for a monday morning today. $2 billion deal in the retail space and the parent of ann taylor is agreeing to sell its to a big retail group that owns
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lane bryant and dress barn. so that should give the markets a lift. we're coming off of record highs already on this monday morning. another busy week for retail earnings, american consumer very much in focus. tomorrow we'll hear from the mother of retailers, walmart and home depot. then later in the week we'll get results from target and gap on thursday. i wanted to mention two interesting things that google is doing in the news. number one, the self-driving cars they're in test phases but they'll be hitting the roads in mountain view, california, google's hometown coming up very soon here. these the two seater no gas pedal steering wheel optional. it's an important phase in the test market. also google according to the "wall street journal" will start having bye buttons on its search results on mobile which is a risky move but certainly shows that google is getting aggressive when it comes to
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e-commerce going up against amazon.com. it will be interesting to see whether that influences the search results we use on a daily basis. >> cnbc's sara eisen thank you very much. we have a lot ahedadahead we'll show you joe's antics on stage and serious roll playing on the part of nicolle wallacebly the children of working mothers are more likely to succeed. we'll be right back with a new study out from the harvard business school. ♪ ♪ ♪ at chase, we celebrate small businesses every day through programs like mission main street grants. last years' grant recipients are achieving amazing things. carving a name for myself and creating local jobs. creating more programs for these little bookworms. bringing a taste of louisiana to the world.
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welcome back to "morning joe." that bump in was a picture, mika of senator gillibrand. she and claire mccaskill and many others were in washington to celebrate know your value. . you had your second conference. it was a moving moving experience and for those of you who unfortunately couldn't have been there it was packed. we had 500 seats had to jam in 200 more. here's a look at what you missed. >> this event stands for the proposition that we need to own
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our ambition, be strong, speak out, and change the world. >> we had 700 people pack the room in d.c. women wanting to know their value and put it into action. we talked about closing the deal and nailing the interview health, stress and relationships. >> as women we often -- there's three words you often hear "i got this." >> yeah, everything's good. we're good. >> and that's really more of a prayer than a promise. >> if you know what you think is valuable and needs to be said people need to listen to it, it's important to communicate it, that makes you a better communicator. >> what you want to do and what you want to accomplish is really important for society. it's really important for your family. it makes a difference in your community. so own that ambition. >> if you remember one thing from my short time at this podium i would hope it would be this principle -- being
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ambitious is lady like. >> a lot of laughs. >> great to meet you. . [ laughter ] do you want to share with us what your strengths and weaknesses are mika? >> [ laughter ] >> a guy goes in there, kicks down the door give me the money and if they don't i'm going to start my own business, it's going to be bigger than your business i'll buy your business, i'm going to burn it to the ground and i'm going to salt the earth so nothing will ever grow there again! >> there were teachable moments. >> don't let them define you. don't let them caricature you. >> and some personal ones, too. >> such as my chance to interview my mother, artist emily brazezinski.
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what would be the most perfect tree for you? >> the most perfect tree i discovered recently expresses something about life. >> we close the day with the three grow your value contestant contestants and their inspirational stories. are we going to be supportive? are you feeling it for them? >> each finalist delivered an incredible live one-minute pitch to determine who would win the $10,000 bonus. >> this is your moment. go. >> i deserve the $10,000 bonus because my mission is to make the world better one healthy body at a time. >> this competition has made me realize my true value comes from giving people tools to transform their lives. >> through speaking and writing my mission is to empower these women to change their narrative from victim to victor. >> and the win of the know your value grow your value bonus competition is kay brown. [ applause ] this was meant to drive home the message that if you don't put yourself out there if you don't
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advocate for yourself you never know what can happen. what a day. i got tired looking at that. it was fantastic though, know your value in washington, d.c. we're moving on to three other cities in the fall. joining us now, founder and designer of millie michelle smith, sponsor of know your value. and also with us is senior associate dean for culture and community at the harvard business school robin ehle. she's heading a new gender initiative aimed at promoting the advancement of women leaders worldwide. bianna with us as well. michelle dressed everyone on stage, including the contestants. you have been busy. it was great having you there. >> it was such an honor, me car, thank you so much for letting me partake. >> the contestants were amazing. what was it like working with them? >> they were incredible. they're such smart accomplished women from such different backgrounds. i thought your mother stole the show show. >> she tends to do that. i started by asking her what it was like to raise me and she said "difficult."
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but this fits perfectly the study we are talking about that came out of harvard about working mothers and i feel the stress already of this debate or conversation because i think it will be controversial but there are apparently some benefits to working motherhood on the part of the children. what did you find? >> that was research conducted by my colleague kathleen mcguinn and two other colleagues and what they found was in a study of 25 countries men and women and through a survey they found that daughters -- women who had mothers who had worked -- had worked outside the home for pay when those daughters were under 14, those women now as adults are more likely to have more education, they're more likely if they're employed to be in a
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supervisory role and they're more likely to make more money and that's true across 25 countries and also within the u.s. the other interesting finding is they're less likely to do house work. >> interesting. >> now i'm looking at two working mothers here and there is such a look of relief on their face. isn't there a way to find a positive on both sides? i always feel like i'm impacting my children negatively. >> i have a chronic case of working mother guilt. i talk to you about this all the time. i was always driven by what my mother accomplished but i wonder how much of this and what your study and research suggests is just families mirroring what they see at home as opposed to something bigger than that. >> well, i don't know i'm struck by the clip before we came on and women talking about their value and what they want to accomplish. i think it's really important
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for women to claim their ambition that way and develop a mission and make a difference in the world and i think it's important to have role models. so i think working moms can be great role models for their daughters who want to have that impact. i'm not saying non-working moms aren't role model bus it's in a different way. >> and what we saw working with these women is while they have incredible ideas and incredible accomplishments, they're questioning themselves every step of the way. you found that in working with them and also being there on stage. >> even for myself being a working mother reading the study made me feel better that i'm setting the right example for my children and that it sets them on the right path for success. but it's funny. i asked my children after reading the study, i said sofia,
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how do you feel about mommy being a working mommy. just very simple. and she said "i feel proud and i feel sad." >> ooh. >> i said "why do you feel proud of mommy?" she said "you're a fashion designer and i get to go to your fashion shows and you make money and you're on tv." she had this laundry list of really cool things. i was like okay, i don't talk to my kids about money but she understands i bring home the bacon which is empowering. then i said "why do you feel sad?" and she said "well, you're not there when i get out of school, you can't pick me up." and she sees other mommies there. >> and i think that's why this study while interesting isn't black and white right or wrong. i have to say. one isn't better. it's interesting that these children make more money and have this but not -- >> doesn't define happiness. >> we'll continue the conversation. robin ehle, michelle smith, thank you for everything. up next, what, if anything, did we learn today?
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doing house work. >> get out the vacuum. mike barnicle. >> i learned that marco rubio is the latest republican candidate for president unable to answer the question about iraq that anybody in the cross town bus today could answer. >> a lot of good stories today. if it's way too early it's "morning joe." now time for "the rundown." have a great monday, everybody. take care. good morning i'm francis rivera at 30 rock. developing right now on "the rundown," nearly 200 biker gang members are in a texas jail right now after a sunday brawl turned shootout left nine people dead and more than a dozen hurt. it happened outside a crowded sports bar in broad daylight and the fight spilling into the streets first involving fists then quickly escalating with chains knives,

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